Let's make a Moss Sweater! Part 4 - Sew the panels together!

Posted on August 06, 2021

If you're just tuning in, we're making a sweater! Click on the "Moss Sweater" tag at the bottom of the post to see the previous/next parts!

Your front and back panels are finally finished, woohoo! So now we'll sew them together.

Let's stitch!

Sew the tops of the panels together (the shoulders), right sides facing out, using a whip stitch. Use the yarn tails already attached, or cut new yarn to sew with. Secure with a knot and weave away the ends, or just wait until the end of the sweater to weave away all of the ends, cuz you'll have lots. You can make a day of it haha.  

Next, do a quick sew with scrap yarn in a contrasting color to figure out the arm holes!

Arm hole trial sewing

Cut 2 lengths of yarn in a contrasting color, a good 2 feet long, plus 2 more strands 6 inches long. Set the shorter pieces aside for now.

With both panels facing right side out, lay them together and do a fast, sloppy whip stitch to sew the sides of the panels together. Start at the bottom and go up. Stop where you think you want the arm holes, then try your sweater on!

Be sure to sew both sides to the same height when you try it on. Test it at a few different heights before committing! Once you're sure where you want to stitch up to, mark the stitches with the shorter strands you cut earlier-just tie a bow around them. Then remove your temporary stitches, cut some yarn from your sweater yarn (or use your tails), and sew them up for real! Make it nice and neat, with even tension, and take your time.

Of course, try it on again when you finish sewing, before securing with a knot, just in case you change your mind.

I tied a bow onto the front with contrasting yarn so I could easily tell which side was the front with a quick glance.

Single crochet around your arm holes and neck hole

Do a simple single crochet border around each arm hole, plus the neck hole. You don't need to leave any useable tails. Do 1 arm hole first, then match that number on the other arm, whether you have to do an increase or decrease (or a couple), make the stitch count the same.

Write down your finished stitch counts for each, you'll need them!

And...I'll see you in the next post! We'll be making sleeves!


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